[Weekender] Reflecting gratitude towards life as you eat: Temple Food

You are what you eat, or so they say. For Buddhist practitioners in Korea, this idea develops further, and eating becomes part of spiritual practice. The dietary culture of Korean Buddhism is not mu...

Updated : 2018.11.29 16:55

[Weekender] Finding the Buddha inside through templestay

Buddhist temples are religious places, but temple stays offer participants a chance to look into themselves and find inner peace, regardless of their religion. For a one-day inner journey, I recentl...

Updated : 2018.11.29 15:23

[Weekender] Temple stay, a window into a different world

From ancient structures raised more than 1,600 years ago to modest venues located in commercial buildings, thousands of Buddhist temples dot South Korea. Buddhism is deeply entwined with the history...

Updated : 2018.11.29 15:21

[Weekender] Prenatal education in Korea focused on having ‘smart kids’

Care for unborn babies, called “taegyo” in Korean, exists both in Asian and Western countries to give birth to a healthy child. But prenatal care takes on a much more ambitious spin in South Korea,...

Updated : 2018.11.22 17:04

[Weekender] Before you were born

Oh Ha-young, a 36-year-old mother of two in Seoul, remembers when she kept herself busy several years ago for the sake of her children, before they were even born. From knitting to drawing, she even...

Updated : 2018.11.22 14:51

[Weekender] Prenatal care market becomes blue ocean for retailers, hotels

South Korea’s birthrate has been in free fall in the past several years, but either despite or because of this, the interest in prenatal care among mothers-to-be is on the rise. The result has been...

Updated : 2018.11.22 14:13

[Weekender] From Chanel to Gucci: Korean women turn into designer rent-a-holics

It is 7 a.m. on a Monday. Hong Mi-jin, 35, an office worker in Seoul, makes a fresh pot of coffee and jumps into the shower. Twenty minutes later, she comes out with a big towel wrapped around her ha...

Updated : 2018.11.15 16:36

[Weekender] Subscription plans bring readers back to books

The rate at which Koreans read books regularly is hitting new lows each year. Only 60 percent of adults read at least one book in 2017, down 5.4 percent from 2015, according to the Ministry of Cultur...

Updated : 2018.11.15 16:33

[Weekender] ‘Subscription economy’ reshaping Korean pop culture

When the press show for YouTube Premium series “Top Management” was held in Seoul in October, it received a great deal of attention from local media outlets. Starring up-and-coming actor and singe...

Updated : 2018.11.15 16:28

[Weekender] Korean startups craft mix of beer and subscriptions

Following the rise of the subscription economy, an increasing number of startups have launched services adopting the new business model. One such startup is Daily Shot, which offers a craft beer or c...

Updated : 2018.11.15 16:21

[Weekender] Salted shrimp adds spice to Korean soul food

Korean cuisine wouldn’t be what it is today -- spicy, savory and soupy -- without jeotgal: fermented seafood used as a seasoning or condiment. And salted shrimp, or saeu-jeot, is a key ingredient i...

Updated : 2018.11.08 18:03

[Weekender] Macau much more than casino chips

MACAU -- China’s autonomous region of Macau is one of Asia’s top tourist destinations to enjoy gambling, entertainment and nightlife. The mesmerizing nighttime view of extravagant casinos shows why...

Updated : 2018.11.08 17:38

[Weekender] Artistry of fermented seafood

Jeotgal, or salt-fermented seafood, continues to be loved Next time you are in Seoul, pay a visit to the heart of the city. Take a gander at Dongdaemun Gate, and tumble onto Jongno 5-ga, where you w...

Updated : 2018.11.08 17:31

[Weekender] Fishy business: Know your garibi from your eorigul

Though the phrase “pickled seafood” may not sound so appetizing to the uninitiated, savor jeotgal, the fruits of days, weeks or even months of preparation, and everything changes . Jeotgal is salt...

Updated : 2018.11.08 16:39

[Weekender] Korean medicine: How it all comes together

Lee Noh-hyun, 32, who introduces himself as a “taeeumin,” or a person with the taeeum physiological type, said he has been trying to eat more beef and less chicken and pork since he was told of his...

Updated : 2018.11.01 16:59